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lessons_leared_from_a_similar_experience [2014/08/01 07:17] (current)
mikej created
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 +I have a similar experience that I'd like to share. ​
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 +I started the [[http://​www.meetup.com/​Write-The-Docs-PDX/​|Write The Docs PDX Meetup]] group, based on what we did at [[http://​conf.writethedocs.org/​na/​2014/​|Write The Docs NA 14]] in May of 2014.
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 +While I don't have the time to run another group, I'd like to share my "​Lessons Learned"​ from starting a Meetup Group based on a conference, tempered by what I heard at CLS. (info below)
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 +I did a CLS Lighning Talk on the topic. Just listing the points:
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 +1) If you have a mission statement, keep it simple. For us, it's "​continue the conversation"​
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 +2) Get publicity among potential members. It could be online or offline. (The key for us was a Tweet by the conference organizer, and a Portland tech meeting board known as "​Calagator"​)
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 +3) Find a regular venue. In the US tech community, meeting sponsorships are relatively common. Alternatives are libraries, and even small restaurants / bars.
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 +4) Set a regular date. 
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 +(Between 3 and 4, you can get users into a "​habit"​ of going to a specific place on a specific date.)
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 +5) Ask for help. You might get help from sponsors. You might get help from other communities. You might even get everyone to pitch in with "​PotLuck"​s,​ where everyone brings food / refreshments.
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 +6) Identify ways to publicize meetings, appropriate for your community / audience.
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 +7) Plan your meetings. If you do "​unconfernce"​ style meetings, plan and schedule the time for each step.
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 +8) Lightning talks can help the group understand the expertise within.
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 +9) Networking Meetups are OK, but may need direction to help users get the best experience from it (e.g. name tags that say "Ask me about {my expertise}"​